Stacey Shipman | The Natural Communicator

As the creator of Engage The Room, Stacey Shipman uses her background in research, wellness, and business to show people who are used to working behind the scenes (i.e., finance, operations, analysts, IT, etc.) how to present themselves better when they move into management or own a business.

Stacey has had a lifelong passion for health and wellness and loves nothing better to help empower her clients through coaching to achieve their goals

We talk about…

  • Practical strategies and advice to eliminate the fear of public speaking
  • The dangers of being that “too slick” networker
  • A strategy for running effective meetings
  • Why Stacey’s background in health and wellness has led her to this career path
  • And more…

HUB_OF_SUCCESS_ S_SHIPMAN.mp3 | Convert audio-to-text with Sonix

Narrator:
This is the Hub of Success the Boston Business podcast with your host Dave Elmasian.

David Elmasian:
Welcome to the Hub of Success. I'm your host Dave Elmasian, today I'm excited to talk to Stacey Shipman Founder and executive communication coach of Engage the Room as the creator of Engage the Room, Stacey uses her background in research wellness and business to show people who are used to working behind the scenes and things such as finance operations analytics I.T. how to present themselves better when they move into management or own a business. Stacey has a lifelong passion for health and wellness and loves nothing better to help people achieve their goals. Stacy is a member of the South Shore Chamber of Commerce and Toastmasters International. She was named the 40 Under 40 emerging leader by the South Shore stars in 2011 and holds a master's in education and a bachelor's administration degree from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. An expressive person at heart Stacy's current living out her childhood dream to become a singer. She takes voice lessons at the South Shore Conservatory in Hingham and recently sang solo at her first voice recital. Well welcome to the podcast Stacey!

Stacey:
Thank you David it's nice to be here.

David Elmasian:
Yeah well it's great to have you. So let's get right into it Stacy. You and I met recently in a networking event hosted by Valerie McSorley who's who's a good friend of of us. But you and I first met about 10 or so years ago on a class for hiking.

Stacey:
Yeah right. So that was a while ago time ago yeah. So what do you been up to since then. Oh how much time do we have?

David Elmasian:
as much as you like.

Stacey:
Oh yes. So we met it might have even been longer than 10 years ago when I was doing those.

David Elmasian:
You were very young. I was very young. I think you were like What's 14 30 mean maybe something like this and makes you around the same. Yeah.

Stacey:
And so since then I've had a couple of entrepreneurial projects in health and wellness that are no longer yeah. But all of that kind of brought me to where I am today which is engage the room. And so what I've learned from all about the wellness and the communication and my background was that I really love helping people tell their story share their ideas formulate them and get them out into the world. And and so that that's the short version right. You know after putting some of my ideas out into the world right now I help others do that.

David Elmasian:
So let's talk about that. So talk. Tell me a little bit about engage the room and you know what.

David Elmasian:
What do you do every day Stacey.

Stacey:
Every day is different. You know as a solo business owner we wear many hats. Yeah. So every day is definitely different from a you know there's a lot of networking some out events or having coffee with people or doing podcasts like this. I'm launching my own podcast so it's called Engaging voices nice. That's going to be with Boston area leaders the entrepreneurs very similar to yours I think.

David Elmasian:
She blatantly copied me!

Stacey:
I did it before I saw you!

David Elmasian:
That's what they all say ….I'm joking I'm joking.

Stacey:
And and then from a business perspective I do some private coaching I do a lot of group workshops and even team and leadership off sites and facilitation. So the work I do is varied and that makes me happy because I don't think I could just do one thing. Over and over and over.

David Elmasian:
Right. So one of the common themes that the that you know I've seen in doing my due diligence or another way since talking you on the Internet in a good way.

Stacey:
Thanks.

David Elmasian:
All I know is that you really help people get through some tough times that can be challenging. Not to everybody. Some people don't mind speaking in front of groups some people don't mind running a meeting. Some people enjoy it. Yeah but a lot of people are really scared of it and it really is intimidating to them. So you know you don't give away the whole book so to speak but you know what are some of the things that you do that that you know that you see commonly that are some tips that people can you know benefit from.

Stacey:
So first I'll start with the two main reasons people come to me. One is because they aren't easy and it's uncomfortable for them because they're used to having their head down. And the other reason is also because they've seen how meetings Iran and how different interactions can go and they can be really put to sleep and so the second thing is how do I keep people engaged. So for me it all comes down to. It is as a few things it's its mindset. So I always talk about your mindset because for most of the people I work with. Like I said they're used to working behind the scenes and then they get moved into management and that's a very different place to be. So we I ask a lot of questions around you know what do you want success to look like in your new world. What You Know What strengths do you. Did you have that you can carry with you and what what else do you need to add onto that. So there's a lot of questions that happen around the mindset and then from there for me it comes down to kind of five key things. One is your ability to manage your emotions in those situations because they can be stressful sure or someone may not like what you have to say. So can you stay poised under that pressure right. Let's talk about your physical appearance and how your ability to command a room and how you're standing or seated WHERE YOUR ARMS ARE SO NOW YOU MAKE ME THINK THAT I KNOW RIGHT. I just set up to put it all matters. I talk a lot with folks about knowing who you are. Like your vision what are your values and beliefs about leadership about where you work about your business about life in general. Because that I think is a real driver. So knowing your why your voice. That's well it's verbal and nonverbal so it's the message that you have. It is clear and compelling but also how it sounds coming out of your mouth right. Is it. Hi Dave it's nice to be here. Hey Dave it's really good to be here. And then I think the most important part even though I'm saying it last often comes first is do you care how much do you care about people. Because in the end if you want them to do something or listen they need to know that you care about them and so it's getting in their head right and figuring out what their resistance might be and what they need.

David Elmasian:
Sure. Well I think. Like you said I think some of the things that you touched upon are all things that we've experienced either as participants or if like you said if we we're the one delivering the message or running the meeting or whatever term we want to use. And you know it's what's interesting to me also is we had a guest on previously and she works in workplaces to help with some of the disparities between how men and women are paid and how they're treated and things like that. And one of the things that she's done a lot of research on is the difference of how and again these are just generalities how men and women behave in group settings. And she said It's amazing how she sees patterns where women tend to be more engaging and and not as vocal about certain things but more so in others and I'm not doing justice but I think some of those dynamics so to speak are what you're what you're alluding to is that can make or break the perceived outcome or you know whether it's seen as a success or not both from the person delivering it and also from the people they said receiving it. All right.

Stacey:
Yeah yeah. Have to you have to know who's in the room understand their styles what they need to know what they already know. I think a lot of people sometimes make assumptions that people either already know or not so much that they don't need to know. But like I don't bother them. But most of the time we don't have the information we need. And then your audience makes it up and that's almost never anything.

David Elmasian:
So in your coaching Do you have like a what's a common path. If there is such a one meaning is that type of thing where you have a certain number of one to one sessions you do group stuff. Is it a combination of the above what just give me a sense of how things work in your business.

Stacey:
So when I work one on one it's usually at least a 90 day period and that that can happen either twice a month you know a phone call or a meeting or weekly depends on how intense someone wants to get or how much they have going on that they want support on deadline coming deadlines coming up things like that. So so but that's over a 90 day period and we have all sorts of conversations about know mostly it's around your presence. It's like how are you. How are you coming across are you showing up in all of these different settings. When I work with groups it varies. You know some of some of it's more long term. Some people want a weekly thing for three hours. Other people want a full day or two days. So that's right now a little bit more custom. But I may I may make that less custom. I haven't decided yet.

David Elmasian:
But the time to visit certainly good.

David Elmasian:
So you were quoted recently as saying I believe your voice can make a difference. I want more people to know they can tell their story share their knowledge connect with opportunities and ultimately make a bigger difference. So so why do you feel so passionately about this.

Stacey:
I think probably because. Not I think because because I grew up.

David Elmasian:
You're coaching yourself, I caught ya!

Stacey:
You like that! Feel like that we teach what we need.

Stacey:
So it does go back and we were just talking about this video we came in here but it goes back actually to how I grew up and I grew up in a family that was very large very loud Middle Eastern people talking all over you know over each other. But it was a very expressive environment in all different ways both get that but always very fun. You know there was a lot of laughter there was a lot of there was a lot of noise but it was always very happy noise you know leave a family gathering and just I knew who I was I had a you know give me a sense of purpose and belonging and all that good stuff. And so that was always really important to me. And then you know when I was a teenager it fell apart for various reasons as things as families do sometimes. And I didn't realize how much that really impacted me until 2006 when I quit my corporate job to start a business. And the first piece of advice her I heard was my husband actually said if you want to start a business you need to network. And so I went to my first meeting and I just had I think a panic attack. I was so nervous going in as a lot of people are in a room full of strangers. But I did it of course. And and ever since then. So that was 13 years ago. You know I wasn't good at it. I went straight into market research mode. Like asking lots of questions because that's my corporate background. But I never got to talk about myself. And so I didn't have a lot of business. And that became very stressful and frustrating and I realized either I need to figure this out or go back and get another job. And I didn't want to get another job. So so I stepped in and in that time I've now kind of come full circle to say you know even though I didn't think I had a voice I was quiet in front of people that I didn't know. But once I started opening up and saw the results of that not just from a business perspective but from how I felt the relationships I was building the impact I could have on others I was like Oh my God we need more of this like more people need to be vulnerable and be able to share. Well you know what's in their heart.

David Elmasian:
But you know but that is the essence of a lot which is you just said which is being vulnerable because you know for the people that I've been to a networking event it's super stressful so stressful no matter how many times you do it especially if you haven't been to you don't know the people you know it's not the same thing. And it was a long time ago but it's almost like dating you know it's like oh am I going to be rejected or they're going to laugh that you know what I am I know what to say. Are people going to want to talk to me and all that stuff and it is super stressful and so I think some of the points that you hit upon are spot on and now. But let's do full disclosure now like like I mentioned at the beginning you and I met a long time ago and we just met recently at a network and now we're here and I have to say this and I'm saying 100 percent honesty nobody would ever think that you were not good at speaking in front of a group of people. Networking. I mean nobody would guess that in a million years how do we not know people say it's me all the time. Yeah. So what I say to that is I wish you knew me 13 years ago.

Stacey:
And I wish I had recorded myself now but when we first met. Oh sorry. Oh yeah. Yeah.

Stacey:
But it it's a lot of work to to feel comfortable in your own skin. I think takes a lot of deliberate effort. And you know like we already said the vulnerability is huge. And and so through my my process I realize how important it is for us to to have a voice to share our ideas because they can impact positively other people. And when we hold them in I actually think it's more selfish and we need more bright lights who have good ideas that can solve problems and whether they fail the first time or not it doesn't matter. It's about taking the step getting the support and persevering.

David Elmasian:
Yeah. So share with us you know what. I'll drop a scenario for you. You know you're you're walking down the street whatever another you you walked on the street anymore but they do. But whatever you know I'm saying and somebody says Stacy you know I just started this business and somebody gave me some great advice. I'm gonna go to ABC networking group tomorrow. I'm terrified. What should I do?

Stacey:
Don't go Oh no. Step away.

Stacey:
Step away from the networking event. No. You know it's a. I was at an event recently. I think what. So this isn't necessarily what to do but maybe what not to do. I wish and I wish like the whole world of networking was really stop doing this is that when you meet someone that you've never met before stop asking what do you do as the first question. I feel so strongly about that because the other night I was at an event and I think I heard that question however many times. But in all different ways. Like sometimes people had this like furrowed brow like what do you do. Like do you do you belong here. Others were like So what do you do as if like it's the obligatory question that I have to as like nobody really seems interested after bad. So my tip is always come up with some other series of questions like figure out what a connection point is don't like. I went in thinking up I'm going to talk about what I do. They're gonna become my client business is off and running. And that is so nice.

David Elmasian:
That didn't work out for me. I'm shocked!

Stacey:
No one told me. So go in with with the idea of making a real connection. Figure out what you have in common with people what do you have similar values interests know fight. Be curious about people because they're really interesting and figure out where the connection point is. Then find out what they do and I think when that when it happens in that order the what do you do just comes off so much more naturally and comfortably. And then the third part. So it's find a new set of questions to ask then figure out what they do and then the most important part that I see fall off all the time. Follow up. Right get back in touch if you made a connection with somebody. Even if you don't know where it's going right now you follow up.

David Elmasian:
Yeah well you know I remember years ago when I first started doing networking events like that we go through all those mistakes and I certainly made all them I still do. Well actually I probably I definitely do. I remember somebody said to me and I you know I want this person created it or just read it somewhere they said if you feel yourself wanting to hand somebody your business card while you're at a networking event you're not saying the right things or you're not having the right conversation and at first I'm like Well isn't that kind of the point. And then what made me realize was if you really do make a connection they're going to want your business card they're going to ask you for it and if you have to offer it to them you might just throw in the trash because that's where it's going to end up right. And I think that's kind of one of the points that you're trying to make which is Is there a connection is there not. Don't put people in an uncomfortable position from the get go because when people ask you that question you may be prepared to say it but it kind of you know it's kind of forced right. It's my natural conversation yeah. I don't think it is. Yeah I don't think it's like when you don't know a kid and you say what grade are you in and you kid just looks at you like I'm in fifth grade you know every adult ask me that question. Oh yeah right. Right. Yeah. So I think that's very helpful though I think because it is such a stressful thing and we're talking about networking events but it could be at a job interview. It could be talking to somebody in the line and Dunkin Donuts because you just start a business and that's something that you would come up and you know it's funny I know. And again I'm making this about myself but I remember when people would ask me or I'd strike up a conversation in a line somewhere and it came out that I owned a business. I always left with a positive feeling because that person brought it up not I wasn't me the brought it right because I knew that that was more natural. Mm hmm. And I think that's I think that's a big part of it.

Stacey:
It makes me think of. Last fall I took him or this winter. I took improv comedy classes. Oh I don't know if you've ever done that now. David Buttner if anyone listening has but one of the first two rules One is yes and and that's based on someone making you an offer because in improv I might look at you and say Hey Dave I'm so happy to be on your podcast.

David Elmasian:
So she's making jokes right now so I just I just made you an offer and you would yes and by saying Well Stacy I'm so happy that you're on the pot. See this is why my standup.

Stacey:
But I think what that does what that made me think of in terms of relationship building you know wherever it is it's like I don't always start with yourself or make an offer and that offer has it at least from an improv perspective some emotion like I'm really happy to see you. I'm really happy to be here isn't it a beautiful day something that they can then respond to.

David Elmasian:
Right yeah. It's like you said it's not easy. It's a it's a treacherous path sometimes.

Stacey:
But it can be fun. I mean me meeting people yeah we are once we figure out how to make it comfortable for ourselves. It's a fun thing.

Stacey:
That's why they need to take a start. Podcast yeah.

David Elmasian:
Oh yeah I don't know about that. I don't know about that but they can hire you. So every business person has things that they love about what they do and some that not so much. So one of the things that you really love about the work that you do.

Stacey:
I. So…..

David Elmasian:
And cashing the check isn't one of them.

Stacey:
Oh yeah. it's definitely one of them. Now take him to Vegas not one of them.

Stacey:
So I was working with a client recently and I felt like just a full heart. At the end of it. And so what I loved about that we were working on her presence and some messaging that she needed to do as a new leader in her organization. And what really lift me up was working with her to really tell the message in her heart and getting her into like out of her head and into that space and then watching her you know practice and do that you know and watching her light up because she was really getting into the right message for her. That brings me so much joy because it. It's on tapping potential. For her but also the right message for her audience. So the connection would be there. So for me the that is all about connection. All right. And then when I do groups whatever I'm teaching is what really lights me up as when people walk away saying Wow I feel so much more connected to these people than I ever thought I would. All right. Yeah. And that's just for me it's total joy.

David Elmasian:
Yeah well you know I think in the world that we're in today things can be both weirdly impersonal and overly personal right. Right. Yes. So I think that one to one connection really might had one group connection where it's a meaningful genuine connection. You know it makes us realize what's important and what's not. And when you make a positive impact on somebody you know you can't take credit for it but it's it is definitely very gratifying. So that's that's that's great. Yeah. All right. So how about the stuff that you don't like so much like paying the bills right.

Stacey:
Well pay the bills actually to. When I am. Paying the bills actually doesn't bother me only because it means I'm making money great because I got bills to pay.

Stacey:
So if you want to make money I'll give you some bills to pay. But for me it's a lot of that just I got payments next week. If you want to make you feel great if you like. No not at all.

Stacey:
It's it's a lot of the kind of a busy work. You know just making sure all the I is my database clean as you know that kind of stuff just not that fun for me.

David Elmasian:
I like to be away from people right. Yeah. I like to be out with the people right. Okay. Well that ties into the part I think we talked about a little bit. We all get satisfaction from our business in different ways. Part of it is financial part of it is the connections that we make. Part of it is you know people that we meet. You know you talked a little bit about the success stories or the times you make a good connection. Every business can is going to attract certain types of people. And when you first start out we all want to be like we just got to but it comes our way. Right tackle on all right. Well but as you as you've been business for a while now you realize that it's not always a one size fits all it's not always a great fit for you. So if you were to paint the picture of your perfect client for me what would that perfect client look like. Well not physically necessarily but you know just from an overall perspective.

Stacey:
So that perfect client for me is probably the probably mid career. I do work for some early career folks who are getting ready for the next step but most of my clients are mid career. They are again used to working behind the scenes finance operations some sort of technical jobs so they're used to being in their head a lot. Process numbers. And then they get either promoted and now they're managing people and they again like we said earlier have to run meetings give a lot of presentations or just interact with staff on a regular basis and they're kind of freaking out about it. So. But they also want to do a good job at it.

Stacey:
Yeah. So care. They care. And so that that person. That's my person that I'm used to working with my head down and now I gotta lift it up is my person. That essentially was me coming out of corporate. All right. But then the second person though might be used to having their head down. But then they left to become an entrepreneur. And now they have to pitch you know promote themselves network. So I also work that angle as well.

David Elmasian:
Yeah. And being the business that I'm in. I see that a lot. Mm hmm. Most of the people in my field are very technical. Or they started technical or they stay technical and so the whole people side of it and the whole sales side of it. And that makes them very uncomfortable and they're their conference space is in dealing with technical issues and technical issues are linear there. Yeah. You know A plus B. We'll see yeah people want so much.

Stacey:
Oh all right. I've actually told clients I'm like Listen two plus two is always going to equal four people are never there so much messier your deal right. You don't even know about right. And it is a very different place.

David Elmasian:
Right. So see this little big audience out there for you're trying to do. So this business is focused on helping people. Like you said in those groups. I know we talked about a little bit but fill me in on some of those steps that you've done before that kind of led you to this. You know I mean many projects I've had. Yeah. Like kind of some projects that you've done some of the successes that you've had maybe one or two failures which you know I've had plenty of them you prior to having any. But you know maybe wanted or two.

Stacey:
So when I first quit I was in wellness as we know it about and I was doing the hiking groups and teaching yoga and fitness and some stress meant stress management programs. But I've quickly. It was a time when this kind of like podcasting and videos and all that were starting to bubble up and I really grabbed onto that. So I launched a TV show like a local community kind of thing where I was interviewing people are going out into the parks and like you know live in my Oprah dream Hey you got a car. Nobody got cars. But what what how. So what happened was I saw the vision for that but it was I was not able to communicate it to other people because it was not making money. All right it was like No just watch the show and people and I can't believe it didn't make money. I can't believe that that's never happened to me. That's my wife.

Stacey:
So you got it. My husband is like go on stage what's that. But what happened was people got so caught up in how are you making money and why why are you worried. I think oh I want you to do is watch my business you know. So but that cycle I didn't know how to deal with it. And it just became very frustrating to me so as I go I guess I got to make money. And I did. I mean it's like oh I don't buy that.

David Elmasian:
But I could totally relate to what you're saying. Good.

Stacey:
Yeah well as an entrepreneur you know sometimes you don't know what's going to happen. No not that sometimes many times it's not going to work. I don't know. But but I was really drawn to that concept of the kind of media publishing I worked in publishing you know as a younger person during the summers. And I had gone to this workshop because I was no longer happy being a personal trainer a yoga teacher I'm like if I'm supposed to have this passion for wellness but I don't want to be the wellness practitioner. What is the problem like how do I because I just get a fair measure. And so I went to this workshop and they said to all of us in the group it was called Action trumps everything. And they said don't forget about passions. What is it you desire. And I was like. And it was just a slight shift in question but it opened up something totally different because I was like well what I want is for people to have tools. And it's like oh I don't have to be the one giving them the tools. I can be the kind of connector. And so from there I launched a website called healthy self shore which served to be the bridge. So I had a podcast interviewing wellness practitioners I hosted events and. But again the revenue model wasn't great. And so after a couple of years I shut that down. And it was all through that that what I loved about and then it from there I started teaching communication. People asked me like can you help me speak better. I'm like really OK. But it actually for me now this concept of communication is really a it's a path to self discovery when you actually share your ideas and what's meaningful to you not just what you think you're supposed to say. You unlock so much potential.

David Elmasian:
Well it goes back to the old cliche when you teach you learn right.

Stacey:
Yeah it's true that too. Yeah. And but what I loved was helping people use their voice better. And so you know today I coach I'm watching the podcast as a way to do that. And once those pieces you know the podcast is kind of running I'll probably start hosting events again as a way to bring people together. I mean there's never gonna be all right. I mean that always has to be something I do because I just love it. I like to play host. That's my favorite.

David Elmasian:
Well we can switch seats if you like. No but I think that you know when now that you look back on it it all kind of makes sense though doesn't does. But you never see it at the time. None of us do. And I said I know I've been through it. I think we all continue to be through it especially we said of where the self-employed type. That's right. A We're in a constant state of denial right. We have to be because everybody's trying to beat us up knock us down tell us you crazy.

Stacey:
What are you doing that for.

David Elmasian:
And all those things are usually true but we don't want to believe it. You have to have that high belief system even though many times you really can't. But you but you do for whatever reason and then you have to have that perseverance. And but I think that the most important lesson that you just brought up was the ability to change has to be part of that equation because if you don't change you're not going to get anywhere. Yeah yeah no. Yeah because things do change around you and if he keeps spitting out the same stuff and seeing the same results or lack of or what used to work doesn't work now. You're not going to. You know you're not going to go anywhere.

Stacey:
Right. To add to that list that you said what you have to have I think also. Yes you've to believe in yourself but you also need a strong support system at home. Yeah absolutely. People also believe in you. Yeah. Who. Who are going to say just keep you know I see your vision with you keep going. Yeah. And the other thing for me that that was really powerful and I don't remember where I first heard this but it was don't get caught continuing to do work just because you're good at it. And that was when I read that or heard that I was like whoa. Because you know if you're doing something and people like David you're so good at that but you're like I can't do it anymore. All right. I think it's easy to get caught in that trap. And that was a really powerful lesson for me. Yeah but now I get to use my whole background. You know I haven't left any of it behind. Which is also really rewarding. Yeah yeah.

David Elmasian:
No. And that's what I'm saying. It's you know it's that path that you will end up taking in. And you're absolutely right the whole thing about the support system. You know I joke about my wife. I think it's a cliche. I love my wife obviously. And yes she also was able to support me by having things like health insurance and benefits and all those things you don't get when you're an entrepreneur and especially when you first starting out you know. And so without that right you know we wouldn't be here. So same for my husband. Yeah. Yep yep yep. So. So we've talked about the past. Yeah. What's the future hold for you. And I guess I mean none of us have a crystal ball but you know where do you see yourself kind of going and where are the areas that you feel like hey you know I can kind of see the writing on the wall in terms of your business and your industry and your own personal growth. Mm hmm.

Stacey:
So business wise I mean I think all the articles I read say I am in the right space because in terms of working with that people who are more technically trained soft skills are big need.

David Elmasian:
Is a future I can I can definitely tell. You know I have to give or take 20 geeks working for me and a few of them can speak a sentence or it so heavily I agree with that.

Stacey:
So I'm in the right space and they you know these people the people I work with I get a lot of people who ask me what do you want to work with them for. You know those types for they're very personable. And I'm like Have you ever gotten to know them because I know you don't want to work for that joke. I'm just saying because they are they are thinking and solving problems like all day long. And so they. Have the biggest hearts. Yeah I think what they what they need at least the people I work with they're looking for permission to not be perfect and not have to be a no at all to not have to have it altogether and to just you know see who they are. So I love working with them they're amazing. So from from a business perspective that's definitely a forward trend that I'm watching. And then in terms of you know I'm launching the podcast I get great joy out of that. And I imagine creating some sort of community of cool people around that I don't know exactly what yet but we'll see where that goes. But so what's the name of the podcast. It's called Engaging voices. And it is a fun kind of like this. I mean so conversation. So. So that's a big part of my plan moving forward. And then what I mentioned hosting some other events. I don't know what those will look like networking education retreats. I'm not sure yet but I will do something in that space. Personally I'm always pushing myself like I mentioned the improv classes I've taken standup comedy.

David Elmasian:
Talk about stressful. Oh gosh. Oh yeah. But so far no. Oh my gosh. Works your brain in a very different way. I'd imagine. I don't want to imagine. Actually I'll take that back. Very fun. And then the voice lessons. Yeah. And I'm getting ready for another recital. Wow. So. So where did the where did that come from. Is that something you've always like. You know I want to say all singing in the shower that kind of crazy stuff but good you know where they come from.

Stacey:
When I was a young girl my dream was to be a singer. I was gonna win a Grammy for what I mean.

David Elmasian:
To work on it. You know it's not like you're 95 years old. No it's not.

Stacey:
I'm not. Maybe I'll tour the South Shore. But I was gonna tour the world and be a singer. But then you know when things in my family fell apart I just I let all that go. Right. So as I developed my own communication skills so all this all these years later and kept asking myself What's next what's the next thing I need to learn what I. Concluded was I needed to learn how to breathe better. And that led me to voice lessons. Right. And then it took me a whole year to sing. So I'd show up every week and just talk. To a couple. It's a start. Do a couple of scales right. But then the teachers like do you want to sing. And I'm like I guess I don't want to sing too. And then Year two I did the voice recital and I said What was that like. Oh my God I was how dependent it was. It felt like going in that networking event. It was. It was like my knees knocking my heart racing I couldn't catch my breath. It was nerve racking but all of a sudden in that moment I was like wow I'm live in my dream. I'm singing for people. And that was I was like oh my god what's left. Like there's nothing. Yeah yeah. It was awesome.

David Elmasian:
That's a big one. I mean I've never thought about it but you know one of the questions I remember I mentioned Candy O'Terry when I had her on, she had just recently had a singing gig and you know I asked her because I guess I'm I know I'm weird but I said to her it was. It was at a very public event and I said. What are you thinking when you're singing? And she looked at me she like I'm thinking about making sure I don't forget the words. Yeah. I feel like I was thinking this big debt thing like or whatever but you know what. I was again going back. I guess we're all different but. Talk about stressful stuff. I could never see myself doing that in a million years.

Stacey:
You know I mean we all I think we all have our outlets. I've always been more of a performance artist if you will. My my sister mom dad they have more like drawing creativity in you know design kind of. My husband's a martial artist so I think we all have our outlets. He's also a great writer but my mind was always performance. I was a dancer color guard in the marching band. Like always liked performing but I didn't like speaking. Ironically.

David Elmasian:
Let's say let's see how life can be if I may someday yeah. So let's talk about you know our first two admitted I was talking you on the Internet Stacy in a good way guy. And so I saw that you have a bunch travel pictures so I'm assuming travel is something you enjoy a lot of travel so and again this is self-serving. I notice there was a trip to Italy at one point.

Stacey:
Where did you find. Oh my God.

David Elmasian:
It was all there was all you know just just travels to you and you went back and said Mom you want accusing.

David Elmasian:
No no no. It was like on your Facebook page or something. Oh maybe yes it is but yeah.

Stacey:
I forget about Facebook because I don't go there much anymore.

David Elmasian:
So I've been to Italy more than once. So I was going to ask you Are you a coffee person or not a coffee person. I love coffee. Well see. All right. Now we continue on this.

Stacey:
So would have been if I didn't if I said I didn't like coffee?

David Elmasian:
It would have been over a long time ago!women or whatever. We've been over a long goodbye. Deleted the whole podcast. Your name would have been erased from all traces. You know I'm joking I'm joking.

Stacey:
I love coffee.

David Elmasian:
So what is it about travel that you enjoy. Obviously there's obvious things we're getting away and all the rest. But you know what led you to Italy. Why do you like to travel and what do you like to do besides going to Italy.

Stacey:
I know that's not the only place you know so well the Italy trip that you saw probably was in 2010 and we went with some friends actually. A friend of my husband is from Italian roots and had rented a flat and invited us to come along. So we said Yeah. So we. So our European was like I want to friend him on Facebook more trips before for a trip like that. I mean it's part of adventure it's the culture. I'd been to Italy before and just I just I can't even put into words. It's just a magnificent place with all the history and the food stuff like all the time where the food's pretty good. The food's pretty good but I would know so. So culture adventure. We love going to Costa Rica. We've been there a few times. Yeah. It's a beautiful country the people are so nice and just the the landscape and environment is. I mean you're on the beach and it's like up to the jungle and you monkeys scream at you. Costa Rica is probably our favorite real spot. Yeah. Volcanoes and just the whole thing I highly recommend we've been to different areas there before us travel is a chance to explore learn new things experience.

David Elmasian:
It's also good too. Like you said to see different cultures. That's the right word but we get so wrapped up in the way things are around us still it's nice to see a different way you know. And like I mentioned the coffee and I am kind of joking about the coffee. I am a big coffee person but. But really the coffee is symbolic of other stuff especially we have talked about a place like Italy or even other places too. It's it's it's time to stop being relax enjoy the moment not be it's not a chore like Hey I got a guzzle down this coffee because I have a meeting to go to. Yeah absolutely. And so we're so fixated on especially for those of us that are self-employed we kind of think of things that way but it doesn't need to have to always be that way. And there is a better way when you kind of stop and slow down and be more mindful about that.

Stacey:
I absolutely agree. Yeah. And that's I think there's a lot to learn from it.

David Elmasian:
That's pretty good for an IT guy!

Stacey:
That's really deep! See I told you, they have the biggest hearts. No you're absolutely right though that that need to slow down and sometimes going visiting other places reminds us of that. All right.

David Elmasian:
Well let's finish up with the segment we called Check your Tech.

Stacey:
This is where I fail.

David Elmasian:
Well you know again this is like the coffee thing. But don't feel any pressure you know if you say the wrong thing you might be gone. You know I'm kidding. It's these you'll ace this. So are you or Mac or PC Person?

Stacey:
Mac!

David Elmasian:
Oh I know what the answer the next one is iPhone or Android?

Stacey:
IPhone.

David Elmasian:
You've already answered this one but I'm gonna ask anyway. Facebook Instagram Twitter LinkedIn?

Stacey:
Right now it's LinkedIn and Instagram.

David Elmasian:
All right. I'm pulling for one here. I'm going to try and help…. Hulu or Netflix?

Stacey:
Oh we didn't have either until a week ago when I signed up for the free Netflix so that I could watch a specific show. We don't watch a lot of TV.

David Elmasian:
I also am pulling for Hulu. I know why I like so I have stock in it or something and nobody answers Hulu. Yeah Roku Apple TV Chromecast?

Stacey:
We have an Apple TV.

David Elmasian:
I could have figured that one out Gmail or Outlook?

Stacey:
G mail.

David Elmasian:
Okay not this when we talked about a little bit. But you could still change your your your answer your favorite vacation spot that you have never been to, or would like to go to?

Stacey:
I'm going to stick with …..I mean we've been to a lot of fantastic places but I am going to stick with Costa Rica.

David Elmasian:
Okay. All right. You know it's okay.

Stacey:
That's pure envy. They love model here Vito. How can you not love a culture. I'm all in pure pleasure living.

David Elmasian:
I'm all in. Well Stacy you know I know you and I could talk for hours. Unfortunately we're kind of out of time before we finish up. How can people reach out and connect with you.

Stacey:
How they go to my Web site and engage the room dot com and all the information they need to reach me is there.

David Elmasian:
Okay great. Well thanks for joining us here on the Hub of Success!

Stacey:
Thank you so much for having me David.

David Elmasian:
Sharing your story…..

Narrator:
The Hub of Success podcast is sponsored by Tech Help Boston. The top rated local one stop tech solutions company. For all of your computer home and commercial technology needs visit tech help Boston dot com.

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